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NPR faced a Twitter onslaught for finally reporting on the downsides of pandemic school closures – two years too late.

The article from Saturday emphasized the struggle teachers are facing from developmental lapses in their students.

“They’re very worried about the students that they had this year, because they saw a lot of depression. Someone even brought up cutting, they were afraid that a student would begin cutting again,” pre-K teacher Suzen Polk-Hoffses said.

College students wear masks to protect themselves from coronavirus.
(iStock)

“Students were learning in isolation, then they came back, and they’re overwhelmed, and they’ve experienced a trauma. And unfortunately, all schools aren’t equipped to deal with the trauma that the students have experienced during the pandemic,” she added.

DR. PETER HOTEZ SAYS HE ‘DID A LOT’ TO ‘KEEP SCHOOLS OPEN’ AFTER PUSHING AGAINST IT THROUGHOUT COVID 

Other teachers also feared that the growing mental health issues among students could lead to teachers quitting or retiring from their jobs.

On Tuesday morning, NPR promoted the article again on Twitter.

NPR tweeted from the article, “‘I basically got second graders,’ one fourth-grade teacher said after witnessing how disruptive the pandemic has been to students’ development. ‘Academically, we’re back to working miracles.’”

Many American kids in a variety of states have had to endure mask mandates throughout the pandemic.

Many American kids in a variety of states have had to endure mask mandates throughout the pandemic.
(Getty Images)

Mainstream media outlets made similar delayed revelations about COVID-19 lockdowns in May with some liberal reporters admitting that school shutdowns were a “catastrophic mistake.” This came after years of Democrat politicians and teachers’ unions calling for lockdowns in response to the coronavirus.

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Twitter users soon called out this admission over two years after the pandemic began.

“File this in the ever-growing file of things we warned about 2 years ago but were ignored, cancelled, and shunned for,” Townhall.com columnist Phil Holloway tweeted.

High school teacher Daniel Buck wrote, “In 2020, school closure advocates refused to acknowledge trade offs. In 2021, the narrative was that learning loss wasn’t real. In 2022, I really wish I didn’t have to say ‘told ya so.’ Daniel Buck is feeling frustrated this morning.”

Purple Strategies partner Rory Cooper pointed out, “It’s important to remember this didn’t have to happen, and actually didn’t happen in many states. The kids suffering the most are in districts who followed [CDC Director Rochelle Walensky, National Education Association President Becky Pringle, and American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten.]”

“Congratulations Leftists,” America Matters Executive Director Jim Hanson wrote.

“The grade level is important here as there’s a big shift between 3rd and 4th grade. They *should* have anticipated this,” Twitchy editor Greg Pollowitz tweeted.

FILE - Masked students wait to be taken to their classrooms at Enrique S. Camarena Elementary School, Wednesday, July 21, 2021, in Chula Vista, Calif. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy, File)

FILE – Masked students wait to be taken to their classrooms at Enrique S. Camarena Elementary School, Wednesday, July 21, 2021, in Chula Vista, Calif. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy, File)

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On Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration approved COVID-19 vaccines for children as young as six months old.

 

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